Smoked Haddock Kedgeree

Smoked Haddock Kedgeree – Flakes of smoked haddock in flavourful curried rice, this traditional breakfast dish is perfect for lunch and dinner too.

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So this is Method 2! It’s only taken me about 20 months to get round to writing it. If you’ve actually bothered to read Method 1 (with it’s fairly ropey photos), apologies for the wait. It honestly wasn’t intentional, I wasn’t purposely keeping you on the edge of your seat (because you were, weren’t you?). I have 2 different recipes for making kedgeree, however this 2nd way is actually how I tend to make it. It results in a wetter rice dish because the rice is cooked in stock (a bit like a risotto). It’s super simple though and on the table in about 45 minutes (probably less for other folk, but I have a tendency to get distracted so every single recipe I’ve ever made always takes far longer than the recommended timeframe).

Smoked Haddock Kedgeree - Flakes of smoked haddock in flavourful curried rice, this traditional breakfast dish is perfect for lunch and dinner too. | thehecticcook.com

What I would say though in Method 1’s favour, is that if you struggle to cook rice effectively every time, check it out purely for my guide to cooking basmati rice.  It’s my tried and tested method (found originally in an Indian recipe book). It consistently produces fluffy cooked rice – my lovely friend Sarah, who had apparently struggled making rice in the past (and she’s a really good cook) now swears by it.

This recipe for kedgeree comes from a book my Mum gave me many years ago:

Smoked Haddock Kedgeree - Flakes of smoked haddock in flavourful curried rice, this traditional breakfast dish is perfect for lunch and dinner too. | thehecticcook.com

Pure awesomeness in paper format right there. I think she’d had it a fair few years too.

Ingredients (Serves 2)

300-400g smoked haddock fillet
20g butter
1 tbsp olive oil
1 small onion, finely chopped
2 tbsp curry powder
175g long grain rice
1 pint of veg or fish stock (use one stock cube)
salt to taste

Notes:

• This is a fairly substantial portion for 2 people, but the Husband likes his kedgeree, so we get through it. It does reheat really well though if you do find you have leftovers. You can also double it really easily (literally just double everything) if you need to.

• I tend to use long grain rice because it holds together better, but you can use basmati if you’d prefer.

1. Place the haddock in a pan (a deep frying pan is good here so you can cook it in one layer), cover with water, add the lid and bring to the boil. Turn down the heat and simmer for around 8-10 minutes until cooked through (I had to use frozen fish so cooked it for about 12 minutes).

Smoked Haddock Kedgeree - Flakes of smoked haddock in flavourful curried rice, this traditional breakfast dish is perfect for lunch and dinner too. | thehecticcook.com

2. Once cooked, remove the fish from the water with a slotted spoon, and if necessary remove the skin.

Smoked Haddock Kedgeree - Flakes of smoked haddock in flavourful curried rice, this traditional breakfast dish is perfect for lunch and dinner too. | thehecticcook.com

3. Flake the fish in a bowl and set aside.

Smoked Haddock Kedgeree - Flakes of smoked haddock in flavourful curried rice, this traditional breakfast dish is perfect for lunch and dinner too. | thehecticcook.com

4. Meanwhile, in a medium pan, place the butter and oil over a medium heat and let the butter melt before adding the onion.

5. Cook until the onion is translucent and soft, about 10 minutes. Then add the curry powder – I use mild or medium depending on whether I’m feeding the kids or not. Use whatever suits your taste. Cook for another minute.

Smoked Haddock Kedgeree - Flakes of smoked haddock in flavourful curried rice, this traditional breakfast dish is perfect for lunch and dinner too. | thehecticcook.com

6. Add the rice and thoroughly coat in the curry mixture.

Smoked Haddock Kedgeree - Flakes of smoked haddock in flavourful curried rice, this traditional breakfast dish is perfect for lunch and dinner too. | thehecticcook.com

7. Add all of the stock to the pan, stir and cover. Simmer until the rice is pretty much cooked and the liquid has been absorbed, about 15 minutes. Stir it a good few times throughout as it will want to stick to the bottom of the pan. If it looks like it’s starting to dry out a bit, add a splash of water and stir.

Smoked Haddock Kedgeree - Flakes of smoked haddock in flavourful curried rice, this traditional breakfast dish is perfect for lunch and dinner too. | thehecticcook.com

8. Once the rice is practically cooked (it will still have the merest of ‘bite’ left in it) remove it from the heat, stir through the flaked fish, pop the lid back on and leave it to rest for about 5 minutes.

9. Stir and serve.

Smoked Haddock Kedgeree - Flakes of smoked haddock in flavourful curried rice, this traditional breakfast dish is perfect for lunch and dinner too. | thehecticcook.com

This dish is also pretty healthy. When I’ve been following Slimming World it’s been a really easy dish to make work (remove the oil/butter and use spray oil). There is absolutely nothing complicated in it. Leaving the pan to rest at the end is important though. We love this dish in the HC house, especially the Husband. Hopefully an easy midweek supper to add to your repertoire 🙂

Happy cooking!

Smoked Haddock Kedgeree - Flakes of smoked haddock in flavourful curried rice, this traditional breakfast dish is perfect for lunch and dinner too. | thehecticcook.com

One-Pot Mexican Chicken Rice

One-Pot Mexican Chicken Rice – a gorgeously flavoursome one pot recipe of rice and chicken that brings Mexican flavours to the kitchen but requires minimal effort.

I know I’ve mentioned before about my kids’ fussy eating (mostly the girls to be fair) but this evening Alice actually claimed not to like a fish finger sandwich. A fish finger sandwich for fecks sake. I had a little cry. There’s me giving them something a bit naughty, and a lot awesome, thus making me a most excellent parent, and one doesn’t friggin like it. Bollocksy children.

There’s not a chance in hell then that I’d offer this Mexican Chicken Rice dish to the little angels. That would be such a waste of a really tasty dish. So I save this for the Husband and I, and pretty much every guest we’ve had since I discovered it. I love this recipe. I love Mexican food. This is basically my version of the Burrito Bowls you see recipes for on Pinterest. But I’m a little nervous to call it a Burrito Bowl as I have no idea whether it actually is or not. So I’ve played it safe. Whatever its name, this is a really tasty rice dish with the gorgeous flavours associated with Mexican food.

Ingredients (Serves 4 adults)

1 tbsp oil
1 onion, chopped
4 chicken breasts, cubed
2 tsp garlic paste / 2 garlic cloves, crushed
2 tsp ground cumin
1 tsp coriander
1/2 tsp smoked paprika
1 tsp chilli powder/flakes
1 tsp salt
240g long grain rice
1 tin of chopped tomatoes
500ml chicken stock
1 tin of black eye beans, drained and rinsed
sweetcorn
100g cheddar cheese

1. Heat the oil in a large pan over a medium heat (I used my cast iron casserole dish – mainly for aesthetics – but a normal pan is fine as this dish is fully made on the hob). Add the onion and cook to soften, about 10 minutes.

Chicken Mexican Rice | thehecticcook.com

2. Add the chicken and let it cook for about 5 minutes, then add the garlic and again cook for a couple of minutes.

Chicken Mexican Rice | thehecticcook.com

3. Add the cumin, coriander, paprika (if using, although it adds a lovely smoky flavour which I personally like), chilli and salt, and cook for a few more minutes.

Chicken Mexican Rice | thehecticcook.com

4. Add the long grain rice – I tend to use Basmati rice mostly, but for this dish I only use long grain rice as it holds its form better and won’t go all squishy like Basmati. Mix the rice into the chicken.

Chicken Mexican Rice | thehecticcook.com

5. Add the drained beans, tinned tomatoes, stock and sweetcorn. You can use any beans you like for this dish. I really like the Black Eye Beans (which I get from Asda), but kidney beans, cannellini beans, haricot beans, whatever you fancy, will work too.

Chicken Mexican Rice | thehecticcook.com

Bring the pan to a gentle simmer and pop the lid on. Cook for about 20-25 minutes, until the rice is tender, stirring occasionally to prevent the rice sticking to the bottom of the pot. If you think the dish is drying out too much, you can always add a little more water.

Chicken Mexican Rice | thehecticcook.com

Chicken Mexican Rice | thehecticcook.com

6. Once the rice is cooked through, remove the pan from the heat and top the chicken mixture with the cheese. Pop the lid back on and just leave to melt, without stirring, for about 5 minutes.

Chicken Mexican Rice | thehecticcook.com

You can then spoon out your servings with the cheese melted and gooey on top. Its a versatile dish. Change the chicken for beef steak, pork mince, Quorn pieces, or just add more beans and keep it veggie. Add salsa, guacamole, salad, soured cream, whatever extras take your fancy. It’s a gorgeously flavoursome dish, and so simple!

One-Pot Mexican Chicken Rice - a gorgeously flavoursome one pot recipe of rice and chicken with Mexican spice | thehecticcook.com

Happy cooking!

[amd-zlrecipe-recipe:16]

Garlic Tomato & Basil Risotto

So I admitted defeat today. After almost 6 years, I piled high ready for disposal, all the clothes I’d clung on to from before I had kids, in the vain hope that one day I would fit them again. Ha. Mother nature -1; Me – 0. Sob, sob.

The natural reaction to such an activity would be to pull up one’s (slightly bigger than desired) trousers and say “Right! I will conquer those dastardly extra pounds!”. Me? I would have headed straight for the Nutella Cookie Cups, had there been any left. However, in their place I had made Mint Chocolate Brownie Slice (blog to follow). Bollocks to dieting.

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And in that vain comes todays recipe. It’s a carb-fest. So not for the Atkins/Paleo etc followers out there. But to be totally honest, it’s not that bad for you. A bit of cheese, a little oil, and that’s about it really. And it’s really tasty. The original recipe came from Delicious magazine many years ago, using barley instead of rice. It’s a vegetarian recipe, and is seriously nice just as it is, but on this occasion I had some ham to spare, so added that. The quantities given will serve two – just double up etc to serve more.

Ingredients

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1 tbsp olive oil
1/2 an onion, chopped (or frozen)
2 cloves of garlic, crushed / tsp frozen garlic
150g arborio rice
50ml white wine
500ml vegetable stock
30g parmesan
8 cherry / 3 salad tomatoes
1 tsp dried / frozen basil

1. Heat the oil in a pan over a medium heat and add the onion. Let this soften, then add one garlic clove or teaspoon of garlic, and gently cook for a couple of minutes.

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2. Add the rice and stir to get it coated in the oil. Begin to add the stock, about 100ml at a time.

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Stir the stock into the rice until it is absorbed, then add some more. Keep doing this until all the stock has been used and absorbed into the rice. Take the pan off the heat.

3. Meanwhile, heat a splash of oil in a frying pan and add the tomatoes plus the second clove of garlic/teaspoon of garlic. Cook the tomatoes until they have softened, about ten minutes.

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4. To the rice, add the cheese and the tomatoes, the basil and some seasoning – I also added some peas for extra colour, and the ham. Put a lid on the pan and leave for about 5 minutes to let the rice absorb the last of the liquid. The pan should be completely off the heat.

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You could add some bacon in step 2, before adding the rice. I added some ham with the cheese as it was already cooked. Or you can leave it without, whatever takes your fancy. Serve with a lovely side salad and some garlic bread 🙂

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This is a dish that needs a bit of care and attention. I find you can’t just chuck in all the stock and be done. Adding the stock slowly, letting it be absorbed and stirring, before adding more, gives the risotto a lovely creaminess. I tend to make risotto when I’m not refereeing world war three i.e. when the kids are in bed.

Happy cooking!

Smoked Haddock Kedgeree (Method 1)

I’ve come across two methods for making kedgeree in my time – both are good, but give slightly different results. I actually tend to use ‘method 2’, which I will blog in time (nothing like a bit of suspense building huh?), but tonight I used ‘method 1’, which I would say is slightly easier, and gives a drier kedgeree result.

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Ingredients

400g smoked haddock
350g rice
3 tbsp curry paste
1 chopped onion
olive oil
frozen peas
2 eggs, hard boiled
salt & pepper

Briefly about the ingredients. I’m a Scottish lass. I grew up in a fishing town on the east coast. So fish was never hard to come by, and always lovely and fresh. However, we now live in Oxfordshire, about as far from the sea as you could get, and getting fresh fish is nigh on impossible. So I have to rely on the supermarkets, where it is usually pretty pricey and not necessarily that good quality (unless my Mum brings me some when she visits – she’s been known to carry it vacuum packed on ice packs down on the train. She’s a good Mum!). Hence why I’ve used frozen smoked haddock fillets here (they’re a bit cheaper, although truth be told the flavour just isn’t as good, so next time I’m buying fresh). So I would recommend fresh fish if you can. And it has to be smoked.

I used 350g rice – for the Husband, me and the 4 kiddiwinkles. This actually left a full adult portion, but as the Husband absolutely loves kedgeree, he’ll eat this for lunch tomorrow, and it keeps me in the good books. I used korma curry paste as I was making this for the kids, but a medium paste would give a bit more spice. You can also use curry powder if you’d prefer – you’d need about 2 tbsp.

So, onto the method.

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Firstly, cook your rice. I read how to cook rice perfectly in an Indian recipe book once, and it’s now my trusted method. It honestly gives you lovely fluffy rice every time, so bear with me. Soak the rice before you cook it, for as long as you can really, but at least about 15 minutes. This makes the cooking time really short. Drain, then add it to a pan of salted boiling water and let it bubble away. You’ve really got to stay on top of it. After a few minutes (literally just a few minutes, probably about 4), test it. You want it to be ‘almost cooked’, just with some bite left.

imageYou wouldn’t class it as cooked at this point, but that’s when you need to remove it from the heat, sieve it and pour it back into the pan. Pop a lid on and leave it. When you return to it after a few minutes it will have finished cooking and you can fluff it with a fork. Hopefully perfect rice!

In a large pan add your chopped onion to about a tablespoon of olive oil. Now I only used half an onion this time, because remember, my children ‘….don’t like onion…’. Still Henry managed to find onion at 20 yards and spent most of dinner time picking it out, one piece at a time.

Cook the onion until it’s soft and starting to brown. Undercooked onion does my head in.

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Add your curry paste or powder to this and let it cook for a few minutes. Whilst this is all going on, place your fish in a pan with water and bring to the boil.

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Simmer for about 10 minutes until the fish is cooked through, then drain and add to your onion/curry mix. Throw in the peas (if you like peas in your kedgeree) and give it a good mix before adding the rice and mixing through again. You can then add your boiled egg however you want it – or not in my case. Eugh!

Et voila! Kedgeree. This is how it looks in the HC house:

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I will add at this point that it went down with varying popularity with my children. One cleared her plate; one ate about half; one just pushed it about her plate a bit; and Henry ate a little bit around trying to pick out all the onion. With six mouths to feed I’m not about to cook separate meals, but also want us eating a varied menu (the Husband and I need something to look forward to!). So sometimes plates get cleared, and sometimes they don’t. But believe me – missing a meal is not really a problem for my children 😀

Happy cooking!